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Call for your views: Study into Local Authority SEND provision

16 Dec 2021|12:49

A new study organised by the University of Cambridge and University College London aims to study the impact of Special Education Needs and Disability (SEND) provision on the health outcomes of children and young people. With 1 in 3 children in England receiving some form of SEND support during their school years it is important that data around impact is collated and analysed so we can better understand what support is effective.

The study is moving into its second phase which will take place over 3 years. This will examine the variation in SEND provision between different Local Authorities across England. It will focus on

  • •    who receives SEND provision, when, what type, and for how long
  • •    the extent of alignment between local policies and the experiences of those using and overseeing SEND provision

The research team is currently recruiting individuals with direct experience of using, providing and funding SEND provision to be part of their key stakeholder group. The majority of individual inputs are expected to be via email and you may also be invited to other meetings and events related to the study as it progresses, and to assist with an online survey planned for next year.

The contact for the study is Jacob Matthews and more information is available via the HOPE Study: Health Outcomes for young People throughout Education - Child and Adolescent Resilience and Mental Health website.

For the wider survey the researchers will be looking for participants from three different groups:

  • Children and young people (CYP), and parents/carers of CYP eligible for/receiving SEND provision, and CYP eligible for SEND provision who have recently completed their education (within 2 years).
  • People providing SEND in schools (e.g. head teachers, SENCO, teachers) and associated health services (e.g GPs).
  • People funding SEND provision in schools (e.g. Local Authorities, charities) and associated health services (e.g. CCGs).